Posted by: hellonhairylegs | February 14, 2009

When you say feminism is sexism against men

Don’t be surprised when I laugh in your face.

1792: A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft is published. “I do not wish [women] to have power over men; but over themselves.”

1848: The Seneca Falls convention. “I do not believe women are better than men. We have not wrecked railroads, nor corrupted legislature, nor done many unholy things that men have done; but then we must remember that we have not had the chance.” – Jane Addams

1850: The Female Medical College of Pennsylvania is established. The first women to graduate do so under police guard.

1855: Master’s right to rape slaves is confirmed in Missouri v. Celia.

1866: The 14th Amendment is passed. It grants all male citizens the right to vote.

1893: New Zealand becomes the first country in the world to grant voting rights to women.

1920: Women in America are granted the right to vote.

1929: Women in Canada become “persons” under the law.

1963: The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan is published. “Man is not the enemy here, but the fellow victim.”

1986: 56% of US women consider themselves to be feminists according to Newsweek.

1991: The High Court of Australia holds that the principle that “a man cannot rape his wife” is NOT part of the common law of Australia. (Thanks to Jo)

2007: The Finally, A Feminism 101 Blog states that “Feminists hate misogyny, not men.

These are the snapshots that go through my mind when people imply that feminism equals sexism against men. If anyone else has similar events and quotations they would like to add to this timeline, please notify me in comments. 

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Sources:

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Responses

  1. Excellent list! 🙂

  2. Unfortunately, for so many men, their idea of what it means to be male is intrinsically linked to being misogynist — their very identity is so bound up with the notion that they must view women as less-than-human, that when we women assert our own humanity, they feel attacked.

  3. Good list. Dates are always a good way to get in-ya-face, I think.

    BUT it feels very American to me, so I’m going to make some Australian suggestions (I’m guessing you won’t want to add ALL of them, but maybe some?).

    1894: South Australia becomes the second jurisdiction in the world to grant the franchise to women

    [and our kiwi cousins say: who cares? 😉 ]

    1902: The Federal Parliament of Australia passes the Commonwealth Franchise Act, which grants the franchise to all women in Australia

    [I had to read the parliamentary debates for this a couple of years ago – don’t remember the detail, but what struck me was the HUGE amount of support there was for the legislation. And I think it only applied to federal elections – so whether you could vote in a state election or not still depended on the state legislation. Still does, for that matter, although it’s possibly more uniform now.]

    1943: First women elected to Australian Federal Parliament (Enid Lyons in the House of Reps and Dorothy Tangney in the Senate.

    [I found them in a wikipedia article here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_and_government_in_Australia – you could alternatively go with “1921: Edith Cowan is the first woman to be elected to AN Australian Parliament in WA” – same wiki article]

    1991: The High Court of Australia holds that the principle that “a man cannot rape his wife” is NOT part of the common law of Australia (although it should be noted that legislation in some states had already made it clear that a man could be charged and convicted for raping his wife).

    [That’s R v L (1991) 174 CLR 379 – free link to decision here. I’ve included it because it’s just so shocking, to me, that it was even considered a POSSIBILITY, as late as 1991, that marriage = irrevocable consent in Australia.]

    Ok, I’m just exposing my lawyer’s bias now, so I’ll stop 🙂

  4. Hey, hmmm I’m a bit young and don’t know much about any of that stuff, and I do not believe feminism is an attack on my masculinity or men in society. I am mostly responding to one of the comments I saw:

    “Unfortunately, for so many men, their idea of what it means to be male is intrinsically linked to being misogynist — their very identity is so bound up with the notion that they must view women as less-than-human, that when we women assert our own humanity, they feel attacked.”

    I kind of feel offended by this remark stating that most men think we need to look down on women to be men. That is bull that maybe SOME men would think but every male person I’ve met in my entire 19 years of living has not been this way. I have met more women who hate men than men who hate women.

    I believe the move towards equality is fantastic but I also believe that some people lose sight of what the goal is or should be: which is everyone being treated the same regardless of biological factors beyond our control.

    I don’t feel attacked by women acknowledging they are as intelligent or more intelligent than me, I feel attacked when a woman says all men are like this or like that. Just because I’m a man doesn’t mean I don’t get offended by sexism against my gender, and yes as a man I do have emotions which are hurt by treatment like that. Please be aware that not all men are pigs who want women below them.

  5. Cire, clearly you have missed the point. She said “many men” not “all men.” If her words weren’t about you, they weren’t about you. Get over it.

    but every male person I’ve met in my entire 19 years of living has not been this way. I have met more women who hate men than men who hate women.

    Well it’s a pleasure to meet you, I haven’t met a mind reader before.

  6. Oh, whoops…I misread that…sorry…thank you for correcting me though. I don’t appreciate the sarcasm before, but I can’t say I haven’t met rude people before (being one myself half the time).

    So then, if I should just get over it and that comment wasn’t about me…then shouldn’t all people not care when someone says something sexist or racist as long as it isn’t about them or as long as it is labeled as many and most and not all?

  7. Cire, I honestly have no idea what you’re on about. Please go away.

  8. Very eloquently put, anyway I said in the beginning that I was just responding to that one comment. I tried to make it plain that that was all I cared about, until you commented back. I acknowledged my mistake and then responded to something you told me which sounded strange to me.

  9. Ok, whatever. On to the next day.


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